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against violence and rape, for equal pay and educational opportunities. on behalf of civil rights and women's rights. we've shown a bright light on women's rights from the powerful economic interest that profit at women's expense to the relishes fundamentalist. in the fall issue of "ms.," we celebrate these 40 years of impactful reporting. from the very first issue, with the abortion petition signed by 53 prominent women who had abortions when they were illegal to repeal our abortion laws. nearly 15 years before anita hill's fame mouse testimony. to our ground beaking reporting that defined genital mutilation as an international crime against women. to our 1996 look inside the taliban's regime before most of the media had even noticed right up to our 2011 story declaring rape is rape in which we revealed the f.b.i.'s 80-year-old definition of rape under counted rapes in this country by hundreds of thousands every year. that was part of a larger feminist campaign and kicked off a fire storm resulting in 140,000 e-mails and letters to the f.b.i. and attorney general demanding the de
. we can do both. to civil rights. one is the right to never be prevented or intimidated from voting. we had a history in many states. poll tax, literacy test, bizarre registration hours. we passed the civil rights law to prevent that. the second city right not to have your vote canceled up by someone who is an illegal alien, and died, voting twice, or someone who does not even exist. that to file its your sole rights. we can do both. now, an obstacle to this is to reference the previous speaker on fast and furious, the eric holder justice department. they claim there is no voter fraud america. the clinical want to poll taxes. eric holder himself said that. they are suing any state that they can sing their voter i.d. lot is unconstitutional even and has been up held by the supreme court. so where are we with the lyrical the justice department? a complete stall. well, this is no accident. the president of the united states got his start with these issues. his first major political challenge chicago for barack obama was with a group called project vote, a voter registration effort that
like you also thought the civil rights movement for african-americans took the opportunity of the franchise to run for office. if you don't like those laws, you become a lawmaker. >> become part of the solution. i think that's -- i want to just say about president obama, he's one of the reasons that people are so mobilized by himment you can identify with him on multiple levels. i like to think of president obama as an immigrant. certainly a child of an immigrant. there are multiple levels at which you can identify with that and it gave people his election also mobilized a lot of different folks to feel that something was possible. >> certainly a cosmopolitan citizen having lived in schools, indonesia, a half sister who was indonesian. as well as american like. that idea of a cosmopolitan person is part what the immigrant story is. grace, i wish you great luck in your campaign. thank you, sayu, robert and chloe are back for me. next we're talking about affirmative action. jack, you're a little boring. boring. boring. [ jack ] after lauren broke up with me, i went to the cit
. in a "there was a country," ch right about civil war. and larry bowman in at the sumwalt writes about how wrong -- admiral zumwalt. look for these titles in bookstores this coming week and watch for the authors in the near future on both tv and at booktv.org. >> this month as the president of candidates debate, we are asking middle and high school students to send a message to the president as part of the studentcam video competition. in a short video, students will answer the question what the most important issue is in the campaign for 2013. it is open for students' grades 6-12. for complete details and rules, go online to studentcam.org. >> washington journal continues. host: in the segment we will talk about variety. our guest, melanie eversley joins us from new york. welcome. guest: thank you. host: we invited to specifically to talk about what has been happening in pennsylvania. what happened in that state concerning voter i.d.? guest: essentially, pennsylvania was a number of of states -- was one of a number of states across the country attempting to pass legislation that would req
. >>> president obama's in california attending fund-raisers and honoring the late labor and civil rights actist cesar chavez. our white house correspondent dan lothian is traveling with the president right now. what's the latest areaction coming from the obama campaign? >> reporter: first of all, the president himself has not reacted to that speech by mitt romney. but last night at a major fund-raiser in los angeles, he was flexing his foreign policy muscles right off the top of his remarks, he was talking about how he ended the war in iraq, how he's winding down the war in afghanistan, how he's gone after terrorists, how he got osama bin laden. those are just some examples, says his campaign, of strong leadership. as president obama honored civil rights icon cesar chavez -- >> the movement he helped to lead was sustained by a generation of organizers who stood up and spoke out and urged others to do the same. >> reporter: his campaign worked to shred gop nominee mitt romney's foreign policy chops, rolling out this hard-hitting web ad reminding voters of what they called stumbles on the world s
became clear. obama's suffered on the civil-rights movement and of the new left. he determined to experience them vicariously. he tried drugs as he confessed and hence autobiography, "dreams from my father." rallied against south africa , political speeches, community organizers, tried to get in touch with the black experience a and in general search for meaning to use a formulation he could not to reject. he shared the 60s existentialist mood everyone must find his own meaning in life and find his own way. there is no meeting out there zero or objective source that one can point* to zero or rely on. he shared the determination to make history rather than and let it happen or to redeem in justice. roswell obama share the post modernist suspicion of the universal values are not universal and probably not true. one can see these ideas that work in "dreams from my father" the highly fictionalized memoir. politicians notoriously live. not a surprise. no future president ever boasted he was making stuff up to tell the story he -- the way he wanted to tell it. self creation is a very
other political ends as i describe, it was always republicans pushing civil rights legislation, being blocked by democrats for five minutes in 1964 democrats pretended to care about black people, and then they just started slapping the civil rights label on causes having nothing to do with black people and, in fact, often opposed to black people. megyn: in today's day and age, i think the assumption is that democratic policies are better for blacks -- [laughter] because they believe in affirmative action, and today believe in sort of a hand up, and a lot of blacks are struggling in lower socioeconomic neighborhoods. and they believe democrats are empathetic to that situation. that's the line. >> that is certainly the line, and it is absolutely untrue. i mean, four years of obama there was an article going around yesterday on the drudge report that four years of obama has virtually wiped out the black middle class. that's just the economic point. never be fooled into thinking that what democrats care about is the poor, the elderly, minorities. what they care about are government sector
. he missed out on the civil rights movement, and on the new left. but he determined to experience them vicariously. and so he tried drugs, as he confesses in his autobiography. he rallied against south africa, he gave political speeches, he community organized, he tried to get in touch with the black experience, and in general, he searched for meaning to use a formulation that he would not reject. in other words, he very much shared the '60s mood that everyone must find his own meaning in life. and find his own way in life. because there's no meaning out there, there's no objective source of meaning that one can point to or rely on. he shared the right to make history rather than to let it happen or trust it to redeem in justice in the own good time. and as well obama, i think, shared the post modernist suspicious that universal values, as he sometimes calls them, are not universal, and probably not true in any objective sense. one can see these ideas at work in dreams for my for, the heavily fictionalized autobiography or memoir he wrote. now politicians are known to lie. this is not
in differences of civil rights, a lot of those who lived through this week over town, the best thing that george bush is that he is not ronald reagan. >> largely as result of policies and priorities of the reagan administration, more people are becoming poorer and staying for than any time since world war ii. >> if there's anything left of ronald reagan's trickle-down theory, it seems to be anxiety which seems to be trickling down to just about every segment of our society. >> if you gave clarence thomas all little flower, you would think -- here is a man who is against everything that has lifted the level of life of millions of blacks. >> i hope his wife feeds him mustard eggs and butter and he dies like many black men, of heart disease. that so i feel. he is a reprehensible person. >> you call to gingrich in your words trickle down terrorists who face their agenda on division, exclusion and fear. you think middle-class americans need protection from that group? >> the new republican majority took a big step today on the legislative agenda, to demolish or damage government aid programs. many of
himself to the naacp in the civil rights era in which there were secret donations were allowed. but of course rove is not martin luther king jr. >> cenk: really? yeah to say the least. >> people were fascinated like king was fighting for equal rights and rove and billionaires are fighting for tax breaks. not quite the same. >> cenk: it doesn't matter if you break the laws as the bush administration did because president obama looks forward he doesn't look backwards. he's going let you get away with anything anyway, he's encouraged by that, if you ask me. carl unger, thank you for "boss rove"." >> thank for having me, cenk. >> cenk: someone is not taking what the republicans are dishing out. the family of a navy seal who was actually killed in libya strikes back. >> one was a former navy seal, and glen doherty and you can imagine how shocked i was to learn that he was one of the two navy--former navy seals killed in bengahzi. >> cenk: wait until you see how shocked he is when his mom said, cut it out. i don't want you to talk about him any more. and then mark hamill. look at thi
and diversity and civil rights. my mama said, you are a democrat through and through. how did you get off the reservation? [ laughter ] >> well, tell us how you got off the reservation. it was a process, obviously. wasn't one thing. tell me a little bit about that process. >> i think like most voters, we are continually being educated. especially if you're paying attention to the dynamic issues we have today, you're examining yourself, because i believe voting today is a head and heart type of process. in 2008 i think most african- americans were really looking at the head, but also at the heart. >> because of the historic nature of the election and all of that. >> history is an emotional heart thing. this was a moment, and this was where my mom truly was. she said, this is the first time that i could ever, ever dream in my life voting for the first black president. i went to work in chicago, and i was also in the clinton administration. first of all, bill clinton, i worked for rodney slater as well, they say remember those who brung you. when hillary was running, i said this is an opport
groups say it's not just about getting in. the u.s. civil rights commission says studies show that using racial preferences can hurt minorities by starting them out near the bottom of their classes. >> if they're towards the bottom of whatever class they go to, they are much more likely to give up on an ambition to major in science and engineering. >> joe johns is live outside of the supreme court for us. so joe, will this decision -- it probably will -- have implications on all college campuses? >> reporter: well, it certainly could. and you know, i have to say, this is such a hotly contested issue even now, and it has been over the years. just that last statement from the commissioner is disputed, you know. the academic mismatch, as it's called, is disputed among people on the other side who say it's unsound science. so just about every single point you look at across the board on the issue of affirmative action and preferences is disputed here in this courtroom right now. what does it come down to? perhaps a very even split. and we do know that justice elena kagan has recused herself.
military leaders, businesses, as well as civil rights organizations. >> ifill: and this laib test whether any of those kind of things matter, i suppose. >> absolutely. >> ifill: marcia coyle. >> ifill: ray suarez has more on the larger stakes and potential fallout arising from today's arguments. >> suarez: and for that, we turn to two people who have been a big part of the national conversation surrounding this case. debo adegbile is the acting president and director-counsel of the n.a.a.c.p. legal defense and educational fund, which filed an amicus brief in this case. and richard kahlenberg is a senior fellow at the century foundation. he wrote a recent report arguing for race-neutral admission policies that he says foster diversity. you were at the court, debo. what's at stake under coming classes of rising freshmen and their families seeking admission to public universities in this case? >> well, the stakes are very high. it's clear that everybody recognized today that diversity in higher education is a compelling interest. it's something that benefit all the-- all the students benefit
of african-americans born in the pre-civil rights rural south, that's a problem since many were delivered at home by midwives and recordkeeping was weak. the midwife who delivered raymond listed his first name as ramon and got his last name completely wrong, but his voter registration card has his correct name. >> do you vote? >> yes, i do. >> has this ever been a problem? >> voting? no, it hasn't been. >> reporter: but it could be now. rutherford says he can't get a photo id until he corrects his birth certificate, which requires an attorney he cannot afford. it is really difficult to get any kind of specific numbers as to how many voters could be impacted by the new south carolina law. according to the election commission, it could be anywhere from a high of 202,000 to a low of 51,000. >> i started looking at the numbers. i said, he is black, she's black, she's black, he -- i thought, god, this isracial. >> supporters of the new law says race has nothing to do with it. it's simply meant to protect against voter fraud, and there is a provision to allow voters like rutherford to cast a pr
of their complaints. >> we're not being responded to a crisis that's now to the point of even a civil rights crisis. >> renters also say the security force is overly aggressive, even assaulting residents who didn't have their i.d. on them. management did not return news 4's phone calls, but a county spokesman says the management group has until october 20th to fix the violations. >>> today howard brooks, a former campaign aide to mayor gray, will be sentenced on krums charges. brooks admitted in may that he lied to the fbi about funneling money to fringe mayoral candidate suleiman brown. brown says he was paid by the gray campaign to bash then mayor adrian fenty. they expect brooks will be sentenced to probation and not jail time because he was providing substantial assistance to their investigation. brooks is one of three former aides to plead guilty to corruption charges. >>> kwame brown is under new strict rules until his sentencing next month. the u.s. district judge from 6:6 -- set a curfew from 11:30 p.m. to 6:30 a.m. he failed to report by phone three times. the former d.c. council chairman
. >>> a muslim civil rights group based in washington launched a new campaign today in response to anti-jihad ads that went up this week in several metro stations. those ads are sponsored by the american freedom defense initiative. it compares muslim extremists to savages. the council on american islamic relations said its counterad sends a positive message. >> this ad starts with this from the koran. show forgiveness, speak for justice and avoid ignorant. we want to reintroduce civility and values to uplift the spirit of americans and to the mind of those who watch the campaign, to speak up. >> the 16-foot banners will go up next week in stations that feature the other ads and stay up for a month. >>> probably no surprise to commuters, the d.c. area has some of the worst traffic in the entire country. adam tuss got an update on some projects aimed to improve the beltway congestion. >> reporter: gas up and go. around here, it's the go that gets tough. >> i leave the house by 6:45. get on the toll road, get myself ready to spend about, what, $15 a day. it's at least 45 minutes. it's like constant
employers and he listed his jobs as constitutional law professor and civil rights attorney. he described his work as talked a lot, wrote a memoir about my identity crisis. he was also little sketchy about the years 1985 through 1987, saying it was hard to remember who he actually worked for. but he did say he was a community organizer and his job description was described as organizing people and to train people to organize. for education, he listed occidental college, columbia university, and harvard law. listed his grades is not available. his interests were basketball, marxist literature, writing about myself, talking about myself, making money, and saving the world. and the mainstream media fell in love with this highly qualified applicant. they fell in love with him because they liked the trifecta of the first black male liberal president. it didn't hurt that he went to the college is that the mainstream media adored. sarah palin attended all kinds of colleges, she was a sportscaster, helped her husband, became mayor, and one becoming the first woman to serve as government in the state'
is right outside the door here, and you'll be staying for signing. >> i will. and as a civil servant of the government, i don't receive any royalties, so the price has been set very low, and i hope you all enjoy it. [laughter] >> let's talk a little bit about the idea that these machines have proceeded us to mars. is it still, ultimately, the target to put a human being there? >> for sure. and it's sometimes very surprising if you talk -- all of the scientists i spoke to really want to be there. they, they sense that they need to be there in order to do exploration the way it should be done. and part of it has to do with all those limitations that i talked about. they all want to go in different places. we'd accomplish a lot more with six people than six people standing on a skateboard together. and i think your point, though, about anticipating or preparing has become more and more real. i don't think we understood that so well before mer. that we could for reasonable cost put these rovers in different places around mars and figure out where would we want to go, where should we land
shared by both the civil rights and gay rights movements. this is about 30 minutes. [applause] >> thank you so much. good evening, washington. thank you for that warm welcome. my amazing mom is here from arkansas this evening. [applause] while i have my doubts, she has assured me that she is not just here to see a cirque du soleil performance. [laughter] it is a real honor to be introduced at my first national dinner by two families who have inspired me since the darkest days of proposition 8. chris and sandy, paul and jeff, thanks to your determination to tell your stories, today, we are all poised to witness history when the supreme court strikes down proposition 8 and restores marriage equality in the most populous state in america once and for all. [applause] it is such an exciting time to be part of this organization and this movement. we are making history, we are witnessing progress that many of us thought we might never see in our lifetimes. men and women in the military serving openly with honesty and dignity. 35 million, 35 million americans living in a state where they are fr
, obviously, that she think there should be no civil rights distinction, none whatsoever, between a committed gay couple and a committed heterosexual couple. if that's the case, we really don't have a difference. >> is that what your said? >> your question to him was whether he supported gay marriage and my answer is the same as his and it is that i do not. >> wonderful. you agree. on that note, let's move to foreign policy. [laughter] >> you both have sons who are in iraq or on their way to iraq. you, governor palin, have said that you would like to see a real clear plan for an exit strategy. what should that be, governor? >> i am very thankful that we do have a good plan and the surge and the counterinsurgency strategy in iraq that has proven to work, i am thankful that that is part of the plan implemented under a great american hero, general petraeus, and pushed hard by another great american, senator john mccain. i know that the other ticket opposed this surge, in fact, even opposed funding for our troops in iraq and afghanistan. barack obama voted against funding troops there after promi
thought many long, hard court battles throughout the civil rights era to make sure these groups would not have to disclose their donors to people. so melanie is right that it's odd we are requiring disclosure of little amounts given to candidates, but not large amounts not given to candidates. i am open to adjustments on those. there can be a lot of changes made in offense, but i think there is a fundamental difference there. there has not been a retreat for disclosure. we have never had before in our countries history, tracking people's political activity. he might jump in there. one of the thing that comes to mind is the game has changed, so has the ability to turn around disclosure itemization quickly. that's one of the things that's happening. >> iowa to talk about the irs. i like talking about boring subjects attempt to beat me down like a path that could never get out of. it is supposed to regulate social welfare nonprofits. social welfare nonprofits, 501-c4 groups come in the whole idea of dark money, their primary purpose is supposed to be social welfare, right? they're suppos
of the poor and study the indifference to civil rights. a lot who lived through it seemed to think the best thing about george bush, he is not ronald reagan. ♪ ♪ >> largely as as a result of the policy and priority of reagan administration, more people are becoming poor and staying poor in the country than many times since world war ii. ♪ >> if there's anything left ronald reagan trickle down theory it seems to be anxiety which seems to be trickle down through every segment of our society. ♪ if you give complearns thomas a little flower you think you have david talking. here is a man who is against everything that has lifted the level of life of -- [inaudible] ♪ i egg and butter many black men do a [inaudible] >> has hard too. he's remember rehenceble person. ♪ your words trickle down terrorist who face their agenda on division, exclusion, and fear. do you think middle class americans are in need of protection. ♪ the new republican majority congress took a big step on the legislative agenda to demolish or damage government-aid programs many of them designed to help children an
in passing the great society legislation, civil rights, the big ticket items and a note earlier era. there is an argument about steady leadership that could pave the way. on the flip side, this is the most partisan, divided congress in 100 years, and that does not count for nothing. that plays a huge role. it also feeds into the frustration people have with congress -- why can they not get this deal done? we know it needs to happen. it is a growing problem. like so many things, policy- wise, it is difficult, if not impossible, and politically lawmakers tend to not want to do with it in until they're faced with all last possible moment to act because if they at earlier, they will certainly be criticized -- why did you make the deal this way or that way? both sides will be criticized. as we saw last summer during the standoff over raising the nation's debt ceiling, it went down to the last possible minute because neither side was willing to stick their necks out and say they would do something. that might not be the profile in courage that people expect from their lawmaker, but it is
's political activities from a fairly young age. >> narrator: his dad thought civil rights were worth fighting for. as a teenager, mitt was less interested in the issues than being with his dad. >> the word from his family is that he was not necessarily interested in politics as ideology. but there was always something about his father and his father's power and his father's profession that kept him around and kept him close in a way that it didn't do that for other members of his family. (newsreel music plays) >> the eyes of the nation are on san francisco as the republican party convenes to nominate its choice for president. >> narrator: and in 1964, mitt traveled with his dad to watch him take on conservative republican senator barry goldwater. >> the republican party should unequivocally repudiate extremists of the right and the left, and reject their efforts to infiltrate or attach themselves to our party or its candidates. >> mitt is absorbing all of this. he sees his father basically taking a stand and admires his father greatly for this. >> narrator: but it was barry goldwater's conven
with add missions policies. as the court has interpreted title vi, the civil rights act of 1964, the private universities have to follow whatever the supreme court says with respect to public universities. and so this is often misunderstood as only affecting public universities. but title vi leverages the effect of this to private universities as well. >> everyone gets affected ultimately. good to see you. thanks for coming in. >> thanks for having me. >>> in our next hour former ohio congressman dennis kucinich joins me live. we're going to talk about cutting entitlements while ensuring the survival of medicare. ase in clinical depression. drug and alcohol abuse is up. and those dealing with grief don't have access to the professional help they need. when you see these issues, do you want to walk away or step up? with a degree in the field of counseling or psychology from capella university, you'll have the knowledge to make a difference in the lives of others. let's get started at capella.edu [ laughing ] [ laughing ] [ laughing ] [ laughing ] ♪ >>> welcome to "weekends with
folks lived the civil rights movement. i hope it happens there. at
. >> on that one? on the issue of civil rights? >> i will absolutely differ from my party. i am pro-choice candidate, i believe in equal rights for all. i would have voted to repeal don't ask, don't tell. i don't think we should have discrimination in the military, the workplace or anywhere. >> our next question is to mr. murphy. >> knowing that voters form their opinions based on political ads, how can you justify airing ads that in some cases have been determined by fact checkers to be misleading, confusing, and downright inaccurate? >> the ads that you see on tv for me right now are me in my kitchen talking to voters directly about the differences between me and linda mcmahon on critical issues. i support a middle-class tax cut. when the mcmahon includes a tax cut for the very wealthy. when history is standing up for the people in the state, whether it's taking homeless veterans of the street and giving them housing or fighting for the most vulnerable and the roof over their head because of a disability or mental illness. linda mcmahon has used her job a very different way, going
of the people who affected the civil rights movement, for example, never held elected office. you look at people who were advocates for women's suffrage or a women's right to vote, they were never elected to office. i think it's instilling that motivation in young people, look, this is your opportunity in your forum. you don't have to have a lot of money. you don't have to be famous to build a movement behind an issue you think is important. and waywire is that platform to allow them to do it. this election obviously will be impacted by the young people who show up or don't show up in an election. but i think what's important is you've got to get more people involved in the process and educated. and the other thing that waywire is a much more serious social video platform. it's not just funny youtube videos or clips. it's actually a serious discussion about issues of the day. >> then we definitely are not interested. brian? we like the funny video. >> a lot of focus obviously on the yankees, but i want to talk about a different sport, hockey. you guys build this beautiful arena in newark, it emp
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 127 (some duplicates have been removed)